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CONSISTENTLY EXCELLENT

 

ABOUT EFFICIENT PRIVATE CLIENTS (EFPC)

Efficient Private Clients (EFPC) is an advisor centric, global investment specialist firm for high net-worth individuals.

ADVISOR CENTRIC

Clients often make use of advisors to assist them in making better personal and business-related asset allocation decisions. We partner with these advisors not only to grow and preserve wealth, but to co-create wealth for our clients.

GLOBAL INVESTMENT SPECIALISTS

At EFPC, we are more than asset managers. We are global investment specialists that steward the scarce resources of our clients through high touch, quality relationships. Our experts assist clients to:

  • Invest in appropriate investment solutions
  • Make better asset allocation decisions
  • Consider their wealth holistically to include future generations
  • Have peace of mind about their generational wealth
BEST VIEW MODEL PORTFOLIO

BEST VIEW MODEL PORTFOLIO

The EFPC Best View portfolio is an enhanced equity portfolio that combines the EFPC local and global equity portfolios with additional asset classes such as private equity, real estate, and commodities, amongst others.

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GLOBAL MODEL PORTFOLIO

GLOBAL MODEL PORTFOLIO

The EFPC Global Model Portfolio (GMP) is a well-diversified global equity portfolio. The main purpose of the EFPC GMP is to find favourable long-term investment opportunities.

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GLOBAl WEALTH OPTIMIZER

GLOBAl WEALTH OPTIMIZER

The EFPC Global Wealth Optimizer (GWO) Portfolio is a risk-managed solution that is well-diversified and actively managed by a team of industry leading experts. The GWO is a share portfolio consisting of a basket of cost-efficient, diversified instruments that stretches across various asset classes and geographies.

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Local Model Portfolio

Local Model Portfolio

The EFPC Local Model Portfolio aims to preserve and grow wealth. This well-diversified portfolio consists of 18 to 26 quality shares listed on the JSE.

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Nobel Prize winner Harry Markowitz famously said that diversification is the only free lunch in investing. In simple terms, this means that you can quite easily keep your expected level of return constant, or even increase your expected return, without taking on additional risk. Diversification is one of the most important principles in investing: It involves spreading your money across a variety of assets or even across asset classes....

To curb inflation, the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) raised interest rates by 4.75% to a 14-year high of 8.25%. Following the various shocks that our economy faced throughout COVID-19, inflation breached the upper limit of the SARB’s target range for 13 consecutive months, which led to the SARB tightening monetary policy since November 2021....

Most investors understand that diversification is important. Research has shown that investors can produce better risk-adjusted returns by diversifying between, and often even within, different asset classes. Someone who uses traditional financial instruments to save for retirement will typically invest in a balanced portfolio. Depending on many factors, they will have around 40% to 60% equity exposure (local and global), 15% to 30% fixed-income exposure (mostly local but also global), and then some listed property, commodity, and cash exposure....

American stockbroker, Peter Schiff, delivered a timeless reminder: “The stock market is not the economy, and the economy is not the stock market”. What Schiff was trying to say is that the stock market, often referred to as Wall Street, is not always an accurate reflection of what occurs on Main Street, that is, the real economy. Schiff’s statement has never rung truer than in the ever-fluctuating landscape of today’s financial world....

Shortly after the turn of the century, following the Asian financial crisis in 1997-1998 and the dot-com bubble burst in 2000-2002, investor sentiment swung increasingly in favour of emerging markets. China was the main driving force, growing at an average rate of about 10% annually between 1990 and 2000, and almost reaching an 11% annual growth rate between 2001 and 2007-2008. ...